Si fallor, sum

It is superfluous, in light of the present Zeitgeist, to stay arguing on whether error is or is not a strictly human phenomenon. Error, defined as “a wandering, straying, a going astray” (HARPER 2001-2021), error, therefore, whose meaning hinges on metaphorical borrowings from human actions, is necessarily to be understood as a strictly human phenomenon.…

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Investment

The photograph is the result of light painting itself. The painting is the action of the hand showing. In the former case, there is no translation involved in beholding the objet d’art: light paints itself on the photographic film/sensor and the result is seen by the eyes which function through the transmission of the same…

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If

“Dasein is ontically distinctive in that it is ontological” (HEIDEGGER, 1962:32). The ontico-ontological dimension of Dasein refutes ontology. Being cannot be ontological. The being of beings, Being(,) in itself(,) catches sight of everything outside itself. Dasein realizes that everything about itself is contained within itself – DNA. It is then a willful decision of Dasein…

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Eskhaton

A painting can look painted. A painting can look like a photograph. A photograph can look like a painting. A photograph can clearly look photographed. A painting can be intentionally made to look painted. A painting can be intentionally made to look like a photograph. A photograph can be intentionally made to look like a…

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Defining ‘the photographic’

Vermeer was a painter. He painted photographs. This is to say that ‘the photographic’ has been with us for a very long time, at least since the happy discovery of daubing paint on walls and stuff.  Paintings evince ‘the photographic’; but ‘the photographic’ could have only become known and identified as such with the invention…

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The Crucible

The photographic is the act of recognition. The pictorial is the look that makes us want to (keep on) look(ing). Photographs and paintings can both evince the photographic. A photograph can labour to attain the pictorial. A painting necessarily evinces primarily the pictorial. But is it wholly correct to say that a painting necessarily evinces…

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A brief history of photography (and painting)

Let us conceptualise in our minds two worlds: a big world and a small world. The small world lies engulfed in the big world. The big world is none other than the world we are embedded in at the moment. The small world, which lies buried deep within the big real world, is somewhat spherical…

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Farewell :-)

Stanley Cavell is quoted as saying: “Photography overcame subjectivity in a way undreamed of by painting, one which does not so much defeat the act of painting as escape it altogether: by automatism, by removing the human agent from the act of reproduction” (in SNYDER and ALLEN 1975: 145).  Yes, yet another trite comment about…

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Sustainable Prospects – Week 10

Let us take a photograph, any photograph, and look at it. That done, let us now ask ourselves the question: do we see the photographic in the photograph? Clearly, we immediately sense that something is not altogether right in that question; some kind of craft is being practised there; this phantom interrogator, we firmly paranoically…

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Sustainable Prospects – Week 6

In this blog post, I would like to focus my attention on the work of a photographer I discovered recently and whose work I found highly pertinent to my writings about representation in photography. In her project, ‘Early American’, artist Sharon Core, carefully reproduced in real-life the subject matter contained in certain paintings by American…

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